There are Halloween events all month long in Seattle—including Fright Fest at Wild Waves. Courtesy of Wild Waves Fright Fest

In Seattle, October means not only cooler weather and changing leaves, but also a robust arts season, plenty of big-name concerts, and Halloween parties. Below, we've rounded up the 130 biggest events that you should know about, including the 13th Annual HUMP! Film Festival, the opening of Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect at SAM, Earshot Jazz Festival, Lit Crawl, food events like the Olympic Peninsula Apple and Cider Festival and Seattle Restaurant Week, BenDeLaCreme: Beware the Terror of Gaylord Manor, Depeche Mode, and FreakNight. Click through the links below for complete details, and, as always, find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.

OCTOBER 3

FOOD & DRINK

1. Feast at the Market
This 35th annual event, benefiting Neighborhood Health at Pike Market Clinic, includes a wine and appetizer reception plus access to more than 20 restaurants like Matt's in the Market, The Pink Door, Red Cedar & Sage, Radiator Whiskey, The Pike Brewing Company and more.

MUSIC

2. Seun Kuti & Egypt 80
Imagine the pressure saxophonist/vocalist Seun Kuti must experience. Being the son of Fela Kuti—revolutionary pioneer of Afrobeat and a powerful political force feared by the government in his native Nigeria—cannot be easy. But 34-year-old Seun has taken the reins of his father’s large ensemble, Egypt 80, and guided it into the 21st century with authority. Fela’s earnest offspring is furthering his pop’s dictum to keep the rhythms sizzling and the lyrics sociopolitically trenchant. Seun Kuti has kept one of music’s heaviest legacies thriving long after its progenitor’s death, maintaining rigorous quality control, with help from several members from Fela’s era. Wear a sweatband or two tonight.  DAVE SEGAL

OCTOBER 4

MUSIC

3. Bleachers with Tangerine
Bleachers, Jack Antonoff's latest project, will unleash its brand of synth-driven, nostalgia-heavy party rock in support of their recently released second album, Gone Now. They'll be flanked by Seattle expat group Tangerine (now in Los Angeles).

READINGS & TALKS

4. Civic Cocktail: Seattle's Shift to the Left
Join Nikkita Oliver, Stranger publisher Tim Keck, and former King County executive Ron Sims in what will no doubt be a lively discussion of Seattle's current leftist movements and their future. Knute Berger of Crosscut will also attend, and Joni Berger will moderate.

5. Women You Need to Know: Janet Mock
The PR copy for Janet Mock's new memoir, Surpassing Certainty, about her life as a twentysomething sex worker is too unapologetically salacious not to partially reproduce here: "Under the neon lights of Club Nu," the copy reads, "Janet meets Troy, a yeoman stationed at Pearl Harbor Naval Base, who becomes her first." But this encounter with Troy was only the maiden voyage on Mock's long, rough, and ultimately affirming journey to becoming the person she is today. "I came from that world and I was built by that world," Mock told the Los Angeles Times about her time as a stripper and sex worker. "I will not forget my people. I have a firm stiletto planted in the streets and in those clubs with those girls." RICH SMITH

OCTOBER 4-5

MUSIC

6. Feist
Leslie Feist exists in this squiggly middle ground of folksy pop weavers who have excellent production and promotion teams but don’t necessarily stir tangible excitement with their output. To her misfortune, she’s not as poetically bizarre as Kate Bush and not as tightly orchestrated as St. Vincent. Her latest release, Pleasure, relies heavily on the tried-and-true, stark-yet-emotive nature of bluesy arrangements to provide a backbone for her lengthier exercising of lyrical drama. She’s certainly talented, but not life-changing, which, I guess, is all any of us can really hope for. KIM SELLING

OCTOBER 4-18

FILM

7. The Films of Jean-Pierre Melville
If you do not understand French cool, if it is a mystery to you, if you have any doubts about it, then you must see the the action and crime films of Jean-Pierre Melville. Enough said. CHARLES MUDEDE

OCTOBER 6

COMEDY

8. Nick Offerman
Nick Offerman—who you will probably recognize from his role as Ron on Parks and Recreation, his various movie appearances, or from making the New York Times best-seller list with Paddle Your Own Canoe—will entertain for an evening at the Moore. And heads-up: Offerman the comedian is not as aggressively masculine or stubbornly libertarian as the character he's best known for playing.

MUSIC

9. Aminé, Towkio
Portland’s Adam Aminé Daniel, better known as Aminé, emerged on the scene last year with the release of his debut single, “Caroline.” The slick and catchy track rose to number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2016, securing Aminé’s place in XXL’s Freshman Class in 2017. Since then, “Caroline” has made it into one of Beyoncé’s Instagram posts, and he released his debut record earlier this year. Good for You is a banana-crazed ode to summer that will stay in your head for days, and it includes features from Offset, Nelly, and Kehlani. ANNA KAPLAN

10. Florida Georgia Line, Nelly, Chris Lane
Nu-bro duo Florida Georgia Line have hit the big time making contemporary country music for the masses. They'll be joined by Nelly and Chris Lane on their "Smooth" Tour.

11. Flosstradamus
Kids these days still have morning wood for EDM and acts like beatmaking duo Flosstradamus, who have forayed into “trap,” a genre that takes its name from the hyper-attitude Southern hiphop of the early ’90s and is characterized by hard bass and manipulated 808-sample melodies. Flosstradamus often vacillate between more hiphop-oriented beats and electronic trap throughout a set, and according to the die-hard youngster demographic, they’re quite good at it. GRANT BRISSEY

12. Imagine Dragons, Grouplove, K.Flay
Choose your own adventure, Imagine Dragons edition. A: You go ga-ga for these clean-cut pop-rockers, you bought your tickets months ago, and you have the concert poster set as the lock screen on your phone. Go directly to KeyArena and enjoy yourself. B: You’re jaded, pop radio is garbage, why would the Stranger even bother to waste the space writing about a band seemingly lab-created to enthrall idiots and irritate everyone else? Go here, wherein I’ll give you my honest take: Imagine Dragons craft an entirely disposable, offensively innocuous cocktail of Coldplay and Mumford and Sons. A band couldn’t sound more like they hailed from Vegas if they tried. C: You don’t know who or what Imagine Dragons is/are. Turn on that sleek rectangle on your desk, go to this thing called Wikipedia, and catch up with the under-30 set, then return to choice A. D: You want a contrarian thesis on why, actually, Imagine Dragons and their ilk are secretly pop-music geniuses and their pre-fabricated sound is a subversive commentary on the transient nature of fame in a post-sellout music landscape. Go to choice B. I don’t have the energy, and these guys aren’t that smart. KYLE FLECK

13. Moon Taxi
Moon Taxi is a five-piece indie-rock band hailing from Nashville, Tennessee. They'll be stopping in Seattle for their Put Em Up tour, joined by Too Many Zooz, an experimental dance group from New York.

CLOSING OCTOBER 6

FILM

14. French Cinema Now
This annual mini-festival celebrating new French movies, presented by SIFF, is one of Seattle’s best film festivals. This year, the opening film is Django, a slice of the great jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt’s life in Nazi-occupied Paris. Indeed, the festival is heavy on biopics this year: Other entries include Marie Curie, The Courage of Knowledge, Dalida (about the Egyptian-born Italian-French pop star), and Nelly (about the Quebecois writer Nelly Arcan). But if you see only one or two films at the festival, we recommend Bertrand Tavernier’s cinephilic collage My Journey Through French Cinema and the idiosyncratic master Agnès Varda’s Faces Places.

OCTOBER 6-8

MUSIC

15. Boney James
Four-time Grammy nominee, multi-platinum-selling musician, and prolific saxophonist and composer Boney James has been performing for over 25 years, and recently announced the release of his 16th album, Honestly, which he will promote over a three-night set.

OCTOBER 6-9

FILM

16. Orcas Island Film Festival
Head to Orcas Island for this film festival—with 30 feature-length and short films—featuring progressive plots and directors. From the festival: "Going into its fourth year, the Orcas Island Film Festival has presented extraordinary films from around the world that have garnered 25 Academy Award Nominations and 6 Oscar wins. The 2017 edition—October 6-9—has some of the best films fresh from their debut at Cannes, Telluride, Toronto, Venice and the New York Film Festival."

OCTOBER 6-14

FILM

17. Seattle Latino Film Festival
This year's Seattle festival of hispanic and Latinx cinema will highlight the Dominican Republic and feature nine days of independent films, filmmaker panels, workshops, parties, and more.

OCTOBER 6-15

FESTIVALS

18. Seattle Made Week
Drink beer, learn about the future of urban manufacturing, attend demos, and party the night away at this week of events celebrating all of the wonderful things that are Made in Seattle.

FILM

19. Twelfth Tasveer South Asian Film Festival
Plunge into the cinema scene of the South Asian subcontinent at locations from Bellevue to Seattle to Renton. Tasveer will show 45 films this year, with a special focus on Nepal.

OCTOBER 7

FOOD & DRINK

20. Seattle Fresh Hops Festival
Being a beer lover in the Pacific Northwest can sometimes feel like death by a thousand IPAs. At some point, the bitter, hoppy onslaught is too much for my taste buds, and I revert to the gentler, more understated domain of pilsners and pale ales. But then fresh hop season rolls around and I remember that, contrary to what all the one-dimensional hop monsters out there might lead you to believe, hops are our friends. Fresh hop IPA is made with whole fresh hops, as opposed to compressed hop pellets. The difference might seem insignificant, given that it's all the same hops with the same terpenes at the end of the day, but an Amarillo flower pulled straight off the vine and tossed into the boil does something very different from an Amarillo pellet. Fresh hop IPAs are lush and vegetal, offering you the richest expression of the hop possible. There is no purer way to experience the hop and its terroir, and no more potent reminder of why we love IPAs so goddamn much. Fremont has a line of fresh hop IPAs celebrating individual hops, as well as a single farm brew. You should get them, and you should also keep your eye out for two of my other favorite fresh hop makers' releases—Schooner Exact and Two Beers. TOBIAS COUGHLIN-BOGUE

MUSIC

21. Boris, Sumac, Endon
Boris don’t want to be categorized. Fine. I’ll just say that the new album, Dear, sounds like tectonic plates shifting and/or a boulder rolled by Sisyphus slowly crushing a garbage truck full of glass. That simple! And they don’t seem decided about breaking up and/or not releasing new stuff after they run out of already-recorded stuff, so catch this if you care. Sumac want to be the heaviest band in the world. Well, I hear a lot about such things down here, but they’re smart enough to mix in some plink in with the smackdown. ANDREW HAMLIN

22. Gorgon City
London-based Gorgon City will present their second studio album, KINGDOM, joined by Solardo, a fellow UK techno duo.

23. Liars, HXXS
So rereading Stephen King’s Skeleton Crew turns out to be good schoolin’ for the new Liars album, TFCF. I got reacquainted on both sides with menace rising dark and burbling like floodwater, and the isolation a human can feel inside said human’s own head. Liars mastermind Andrew Angus shows up solo in a wedding dress for the cover, waiting for someone to take it, not from him but with him. He’s the only one left from what used to be a band, and he’s down to less in-your-face Lecter, more brooding over time lost and how much is left.  ANDREW HAMLIN

24. Ludovico Einaudi
Iconic Italian composer and pianist Ludovico Einaudi has topped the classical charts in 42 countries and recently released an album called Elements.

OCTOBER 8

MUSIC

25. Tech N9ne, Krizz Kaliko, Illest Uminati, Swisher Sleep
Hip hop legend Tech N9ne brings his many evolutions to the Showbox stage, with guests Krizz Kaliko, Illest Uminati, and Swisher Sleep on his second Seattle tour stop of 2017.

OCTOBER 8-NOVEMBER 12

MUSIC

26. Earshot Jazz Festival
If you have any love for jazz in the Pacific Northwest, clear your schedule right now for the Earshot Jazz Festival. The nonprofit Earshot began life in 1984 and has presented 2,500 concerts since then, and the festival marks the yearly culmination of their programming. This year, it will feature more than 50 events in venues across the city, including "the contemporary giants of the art" (Brad Mehldau, Brian Blade, and Wycliffe Gordon), according to Charles Mudede, not to mention the avant-garde star Satoko Fuji and Greg Tate's Burnt Sugar Arkestra, which is "all about Miles Davis fusion period." What keeps Earshot so vital, year after year? "Jazz is an expanding universe," said festival executive director John Gilbreath to The Stranger's Dave Segal in 2014. "All directions. All of the time. In Seattle, as around the world. And that's the juice for this festival, presenting that momentum within the frame of this place, at this time."

OCTOBER 9

FESTIVALS

27. Indigenous Peoples Day Celebration
In 2014, the Seattle City Council unanimously voted to stop celebrating the voyage of Christopher Columbus and turn the second Monday in October into a day of recognition of Native American cultures and peoples. As Ana Sofia Knauf wrote in 2016, with this move, Seattle "stepped onto the correct side of American history." This year, the United Indians of All Tribes will once again lead a march from Westlake Park to City Hall, host a lunch with guest speakers, and serve a dinner accompanied by cultural performances, round dancing, and singing in honor of the holiday. More events will be popping up as the day approaches, so stay tuned.

READINGS & TALKS

28. Art Garfunkel: What Is It All But Luminous
American songbook legend and general beloved weirdo Art Garfunkel will bring his decades of folk-pop experience, myriad of chart-topping hits, and literal thousands of miles walked and the memories therein to Seattle. Garfunkel will share his highly anticipated memoir What Is It All But Luminous: Notes From an Underground Man.

29. Steph(en) Burt
Steph(en) Burt is a Harvard professor of English, one of the greatest living literary critics, and a very good transgender poet. Burt is touring with a new book called The Poem Is You, which offers 60 good readings of poems. If you have ever thought to yourself, "I don't get poetry!" then this lecture is for you. Also, you can just e-mail me. I'm right here. RICH SMITH

OCTOBER 9-10

MUSIC

30. The War on Drugs, Phoebe Bridgers
There’s a paradox at the heart of the War on Drugs. For a band so baldly influenced by the freewheeling Americana of Springsteen, Petty, and Dylan, their music can sound strangely tense and stultifying. The most obvious cause is WoD mastermind Adam Granduciel’s reputation as a fastidious studio obsessive. Most War on Drugs songs are rich with detail: layers upon layers of guitar and synth, carefully calibrated vintage effects. But the music, though frequently gorgeous, rarely has room to breathe. Instead, it bellows—Granduciel’s work has increasingly taken on an anthemic, shouting-toward-the-cheap-seats quality. And, unsurprisingly, it’s paid off with sold-out dates like this one. ANDREW GOSPE

OCTOBER 10

MUSIC

31. King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard, Tropical Fuck Storm
King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard are a collection of seven Aussies who produce music on a frequency like no other. King Gizzard put out at least two albums a year, and they’ve said they want to put out four or five in 2017 (they’re up to three already). Their music changes from record to record, but it always has something unique—including an infinitely looping album to a full-length recorded exclusively with microtonal guitars. You never quite know exactly what you’re going to get with these guys, but their live show is guaranteed to be outrageous. ANNA KAPLAN

32. Ms. Lauryn Hill, Nas, Hannibal Buress, Chronixx, Nick Grant
We have said more than enough already about Lauryn Hill’s personal shit. Let’s just stop the gossip and focus our attention on the fact that hiphop has only a handful of female rappers who really made it big (meaning, entered the mainstream) by selling nothing but skills, and Ms. Lauryn Hill is one of those rappers. Her name is on two albums in the hiphop canon—the Fugees’ The Score and The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill. There is also the raw boom-bap of the track “Lost Ones,” which is on Miseducation and put any doubt about her skills on the mic in the grave. So none of this talking behind her back—let’s just show some respect to someone who contributed to the great adventure of hiphop.  CHARLES MUDEDE

OCTOBER 11

MUSIC

33. Gillian Welch
The phenomenon of seeing the “two person band called Gillian Welch” (Welch and David Rawlings) play and sing together really does feel like a miracle. You’ve seen people do what they do before—roughly—which is to pick guitars and sing new old-timey songs in complicated, perfect harmonies, but Welch and Rawlings are less like a conventional duet than an exercise in alchemy, the migration of souls, transubstantiation. I’m sure their secret has something to do with attention to detail, attunement to instinct, or just good old-fashioned talent, but I’ve seen them many times, in 2,000-seat theaters, movie houses, and living rooms, but I’ve never come anywhere near understanding just what it is that makes them and their work so special. Lucky for me (and less fussy people) that not understanding isn’t a requirement. Sometimes you can just listen and love it. SEAN NELSON

34. Hope Sandoval & the Warm Inventions, Daydream Machine
One good thing about Hope Sandoval: If you like her earlier work with Opal and Mazzy Star and previous recordings with the Warm Inventions, her latest unit with My Bloody Valentine drummer Colm Ó Cíosóig, you’ll probably dig her new stuff, too. For example, the just-released Son of a Lady EP captures Sandoval and company’s keen grasp of melancholy melodiousness in an intimate orchestral-pop vein. Fans of Lee Hazlewood and Nico should sigh with deep pleasure over these songs and, by extension, everything Sandoval’s done since the late 1980s.  DAVE SEGAL

OCTOBER 12

FOOD & DRINK

35. Eat Your Heart Out
Join Tom Douglas, Renee Erickson, Edouardo Jordan, Jason Stratton, Josh Henderson, Kari Brunson, and many others in supporting those affected by the recent natural disasters around the world. Enjoy bites from several chefs, including Etta's Andrew Rivera. All proceeds benefit Direct Relief.

36. Omnivorous
A benefit for the great Capitol Hill Housing, Omnivorous will be full of food and drink from dozens of places that are also great, including Marjorie, Cafe Presse, Grim's, Le Pichet, L'Oursin, Lost Lake, Caffe Vita, Rumba, Optimism Brewing Co., That Brown Girl Cooks!, Monsoon, and more. Proceeds from the event will go to help CHH provide safe, affordable housing for people of limited means.

MUSIC

37. alt-J
Alt-J sound like the survivors of the electro-war waking up, hastily trying to re-invent the language of emotions through reverse engineering of forest sounds, just in time to headline an Ewok luau. JOSH BIS

38. Gavin Degraw
Despite 14 years having passed since his breakout album, Chariot, Gavin DeGraw has reemerged for his "Raw" Tour, named for the manner in which he'll be spilling out those indie pop-rock throwback tracks.

39. Live @ Benaroya Hall: Sun Kil Moon
Mark Kozelek of Sun Kil Moon has spent his career wrangling his choked acoustic darkness into a marketable shape, and that decades-old practice remains the case with his latest album, titled Jesu / Sun Kil Moon, a project in partnership with perma-weird Brit experiment human Justin Broadrick of the early ’00s band Jesu, known for their coherent drone-gaze. As much as I prefer the imagery of Kozelek’s lone figure bleating into the void (as it is in much of his music), the partnership works. It’s got a very mid-’90s “The Future Is Nigh” vibe, with an innate sense that you’re keeping pace with a guy traversing his neighborhood as he shout-mumbles distinct memories throughout his life of every corner he rounds, set to the slash-and-burn reverb of three-chord guitar riffs and the background noise of someone banging their face against a kick drum. There’s something very therapeutic about Kozelek screaming “SUCK MY HUNDRED MILLION DOLLAR DICK” over a backing track that a bored high-schooler could’ve arranged. Humor and angst, what else do you need? KIM SELLING

READINGS & TALKS

40. Dan Savage with Esther Perel
Belgian psychotherapist Esther Perel is known for the 2007 book Mating in Captivity: Unlocking Erotic Intelligence, her podcast Where Should We Begin? and her popular TED talks. At this event, she'll join our own snarky, hilarious, and helpful relationship expert Dan Savage to discuss her new book The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity. Expect a frank and entertaining discussion about cheating, "successful" relationships, and love.

OCTOBER 12-14

MUSIC

41. Joe Bonamassa
Grammy-nominated blues-rock guitarist and genre icon Joe Bonamassa has set off on his North American Fall Tour, in support of his latest solo studio album, Blues of Desperation. Joe has been hailed worldwide as one of the greatest guitar players of his generation.

OCTOBER 12-15

FESTIVALS

42. Taste of Iceland
Join Iceland Naturally for its tenth year of celebrating Icelandic culture with four days of the Nordic nation's cuisine, music, art, film, and literature. Among other giveaways at this year's event, guests can win a trip to Iceland.

PERFORMANCE

43. Jody Kuehner/Cherdonna Shinatra: Kissing Like Babies: Part III of one great, bright, brittle alltogetherness
You never know what you’re going to get with Cherdonna, the female impersonator impersonator (or is it female female impersonator?) who combines dance, performance art, drag, music, and political commentary into uncategorizable spectacles. The political commentary is almost never explicit, so here’s a handy tip: This one "explores the infantilization of the feminine.” It’s also said to be faster paced than some of her recent work, and it will include a chorus of adult toddlers and a seven piece brass marching band. I can’t wait. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

OCTOBER 12-22

FILM

44. TWIST: Seattle Queer Film Festival
Local shorts, indie features, and national or international releases will stoke and satisfy your appetite for gay, lesbian, bi, trans, and otherwise queer-focused films, from hot romances to incisive documentaries to perverse suspense flicks. If you love queer movies and moviemakers, this festival is indispensable: Not only will you watch the pivotal LGBTQ+ films of the year (last year, the lineup included Clyde Peterson's extraordinary Torrey Pines, just to give you an idea), you'll also get the chance to rendezvous with filmmakers and take cinema workshops.

OCTOBER 12-29

PERFORMANCE

45. BenDeLaCreme: Beware the Terror of Gaylord Manor
Someone got wise and gave BenDeLaCreme a Halloween show. The fact that that someone is ACT Theatre, a company not exactly known for big drag blowouts, is suspicious, but for BenDeLaCreme I'm willing to suspend my disbelief. This horrific tale begins—where else—at Gaylord Manor, where a team of "paranormal researchers" have found themselves on this fateful night. Soon they're beset by "vampire vixens, well-built werewolves, mischievous mummies and witches that WERK," and it only gets more fabulously frightening from there. RICH SMITH

46. Disney's Aladdin
Laugh if you must, but Disney's Aladdin is great. Any musical that has lyrics written by Howard Ashman is a masterpiece in my eyes. Granted, Ashman died (heartbreakingly, of complications related to AIDS, at the age of 40) before Disney produced Aladdin, so only a few of the songs in the final cut of the movie were his—specifically the linguistically dazzling tongue twisters “Prince Ali” and “Friend Like Me.” But as with The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast, the stage version includes songs you may not know, and some of them have lyrics by Ashman, including “Proud of Your Boy.” CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

OCTOBER 13

FOOD & DRINK

47. Science of Spirits
Science: It gets you drunk! Sample booze from local distilleries and learn why alcohol does the wonderful things that it does. Plus, enjoy the Science Center's attractions after hours.

48. Taste America: Seattle
Ashley Christensen, alumnus of Iron Chef and James Beard Award winner, has won the title of "All-Star Chef" at this year's James Beard Foundation "Taste America" dinner, taking place right here in Seattle. The annual event, which spans six weekends from September 22 to November 11, has stops in 10 American cities, including Austin, Boston, Chicago, Kansas City, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Francisco, and our fair city. The star-studded lineup at the Seattle dinner includes past James Beard Award winners Matt Dillon and Holly Smith. In addition to a reception featuring samples from some of the city's best chefs, there will also be a four-course dinner, prepared by Christensen.

MUSIC

49. Bone Thugs-N-Harmony with Guests
“Tha Crossroads” is one of the sacred texts of rap, a Grammy-winning, heart-bursting, radio-dominating slice of maudlin thug life, perfectly suited to the post-Eazy, post-Pac, post-B.I.G. hiphop scene of the latter ’90s. The album from which it sprang, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony's E. 1999 Eternal, is rightly considered a classic of the era, with equally transcendent bits of street knowledge like “Budsmokers Only” and “1st of tha Month” sprinkled liberally, magically, throughout. KYLE FLECK

50. The Mavericks
The Mavericks are scene legends, having started in the Miami punk club crowd, and made their way into a groove all their own, drawing on a mix of classic country, cow-punk, and rhythmic Latin standards.

51. RL Grime
RL Grime's gusty, crystallized "Amphibian" swishes solidly out of the speakers. This is the sound of the selfie, and it's time to display to potential mates that your vibe couldn't be righter. Grime's sonic ingredients set you up well—the glide of rave, the tonnage of Southern rap beats, and the game (shame) of meathead trap. Your moves are succinct demonstrations of pelvic knowledge. Next up on the system is the harder-hitting "Valhalla" off Grime's new album, Void. You let out an eighth of a twerk, and then it's the build. Feel it ascend—whap whap whap whap, tat-tat-tat-tat, ta-ta-ta-ta shuffffle. Then the moment of silence, the hesitation, and the drop. The room loses it when the beat kicks in. Vodka Red Bulls spill everywhere. People fall and flail. This is what you've worked for—this losing it. The room combusts in selfies, sex explodes, and you dance like a condor. TRENT MOORMAN

SPORTS & RECREATION

52. Air Sex World Championships
Watching someone shred an imaginary guitar is fun, but not as much fun as watching someone have imaginary sex onstage, alone, with imaginary partners. That's exactly what you'll see at this kinky sporting event created and hosted by comedian Chris Trew.

OCTOBER 13-15

FOOD & DRINK

53. COWABUNGA
Cowabunga USA, a beef-filled bacchanalia brought to you by Seattle Met and Amazon, is three days full of 9,481 pounds of red meat. There will also be over 50 chefs preparing said beef. There are different events and activities each day.
(This event was moved to November.)

54. Olympic Peninsula Apple & Cider Festival
It's a fact that cider is one of those things essentially Northwest—it defines our region, and it's always seemed to especially define the fall. Take advantage of apple season this year with the first annual Olympic Peninsula Apple & Cider Festival, an ambitious three-day celebration of cider and the fruit it comes from. On Friday, indulge in a five-course feast paired with Alpenfire ciders and prepared by former Canlis executive sous chef Deborah Taylor and her husband, Scott Ross, (the couple who owns the buzzy new Port Townsend restaurant Finistére). The festivities will continue with a "hard cider tasting festival" on Saturday, featuring more than 40 ciders, apple pressing, live music, and an after-party that promises a fire show. To close out the weekend, there will be open houses at participating cideries, distilleries, and tap rooms on Sunday.

OCTOBER 13-NOVEMBER 5

PERFORMANCE

55. Ragtime
This musical is “rarely produced at the professional level due to the sheer size of it,” a source at 5th Avenue Theatre said. “It calls for a nearly 30-person cast and the orchestra is monstrous.” But after Theatre Latte Da in Minneapolis produced a stripped-down, streamlined version of Ragtime with very little in the way of a set, the 5th Avenue hired that same director, Peter Rothstein, to do a similar production for Seattle. The cast includes talented 5th Avenue all-stars like Joshua Carter, Louis Hobson, and Kendra Kassebaum. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

OCTOBER 13-NOVEMBER 12

PERFORMANCE

56. The Crucible
Arthur Miller's The Crucible is a powerful play that's also fun: the McCarthy-era communist witch hunts are communicated through the Salem witch trials, a device that enables Miller to combine themes of ideological and political paranoia with religious zealotry, teenage girl drama, and foreboding scenes of creepy witchery. Knowing ACT, they'll also manage to tie in relevant Trump-era mind games and intimidation.

OCTOBER 14

COMMUNITY

57. Diwali Ball
Celebrate India’s Festival of Lights, which honors "the triumph of good over evil." The Ball will feature henna, fortune tellers, dance performances, live music, tours of SAM's collection, food, drinks, and dancing.

58. The Diwali Experience
Celebrate India's Festival of Lights at MoPOP by watching a traditional diya-lighting ceremony, getting a henna tattoo, dancing to a Bollywood set by DJ RDX, watching YouTube singer Arjun perform, and more.

MUSIC

59. The Kooks with Barns Courtney
Brighton rockers The Kooks have entered their thirteenth year of playing together and will showcase tracks from The Best of... So Far at this tour stop with bluesy singer-songwriter Barns Courtney.
(This event was moved to June 2018.)

60. Nick Murphy, Charlotte Cardin, Heathered Pearls
Nick Murphy has returned to his actual name after years of making swirling electro-soul under the name "Chet Faker." With a new album and an extensive tour, he'll continue to soundtrack elitist music festival after-parties the world over for years to come.

READINGS & TALKS

61. Whitney Cummings
Comedian and actress Whitney Cummings (Whitney and 2 Broke Girls) will visit Seattle to speak about "codependence, addiction, workaholism, dating narcissists and a host of other mortifying situations." She'll also share her new book, I'm Fine...and Other Lies.

OCTOBER 14-28

PERFORMANCE

62. The Barber of Seville
Gioachino Rossini's classically humorous and high-energy opera The Barber of Seville, known as the prequel to Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro, will be given a slightly modernized tweak by Seattle Opera. The sets and costumes have been created squarely under the influence of the worlds of Wes Anderson and Pedro Almodóvar, and each performance will feature a special appearance by Juilliard-trained burlesque sensation Marc Kenison (as his alter ego Waxie Moon) in the role of Ambrogio. This production will of course still be in Italian with English subtitles.

OCTOBER 15

MUSIC

63. Arcade Fire with Phantogram
We agreed that Montreal-based Arcade Fire have a suspended-over-your-own-body quality to their sound, something lambent and at peace. Reflektor rises spiked with endorphins and heads toward a bright white light, of a disco ball. The band lives in melodies and etched euphonic conglomerations. For Reflektor, the Grammy winners took the baroque and wood from the casket of their previous releases and fashioned it into a dance floor. Sounds embody much more bubble machine than hymnal. Arrangements travel an arc lit by the husband-and-wife harmonies of Win Butler and Régine Cassagne. TRENT MOORMAN

64. Kaki King and Lost Lander
A routine singer-songwriter Kaki King is not. Her toolbox of guitar techniques includes fanning, finger tapping, flamenco, and other uncommon methods. Put another way, she knows how to get more sounds out of a guitar than almost anyone, and it’s served her pretty well: King has contributed to the Into the Wild and August Rush soundtracks, as well as to albums by the Foo Fighters and Miley Cyrus, plus a collaborative EP with the Mountain Goats. Solo, King’s versatility makes predicting her sound kind of tricky. She’s as adept at pop songs as she is at experimental loops. Always, though, her playing is pyrotechnic. JOSEPH SCHAFER

CLOSING OCTOBER 15

PERFORMANCE

65. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
To say Malika Oyetimein is “having a good year” is an understatement. Though she just graduated from the University of Washington school of drama this year, her direction of Robert O’Hara’s Barbecue showcased her comic chops and her ability to handle big ensembles, while her direction of Katori Hall’s Hoodoo Love proved she’s not afraid to get in your face with intense material. And now she’s co-adatping one of the most harrowing and yet triumphant memoirs written in the English language? Not to be missed. Neither is Dedra D. Woods, who plays the indomitable Mother Dear. Also—Book-It is kinda good this year? I’m still thinking about their incredible production of T. Geronimo Johnson’s Welcome to Braggsville. RICH SMITH

OCTOBER 15-NOVEMBER 2

FOOD & DRINK

66. Seattle Restaurant Week
I think Seattle Restaurant Week benefits all parties involved. For one, it provides access to a host of the city's best restaurants at a price comparable to what you'd pay to Postmates for some mediocre pad thai. You can go out to all the places you've been meaning to go, try a wide swath of their menu, and leave with your financial well-being intact. It's only $33 for three courses, and only $18 at lunch! At places like Lark, Tilth, and Terra Plata! For two, restaurants win because it brings in all those people who have been meaning to go but have never gone, and potentially converts them to return customers. Regulars are, as any restauranteur will tell you, the real meat and bread of the business. Lastly, the actual restaurant staff wins because, if you're not a bad person, you listen to the sage advice my predecessor Bethany Jean Clement used to give every year, "Tip well, these things are hell for servers." TOBIAS COUGHLIN-BOGUE

OCTOBER 16

READINGS & TALKS

67. Armistead Maupin: Logical Family
San Francisco-based novelist Armistead Maupin was one of the first authors to write about AIDS (in 1983) and is best known for his Tales of the City series. His latest book, Logical Family, is a photograph-filled memoir that Neil Gaiman described as "fascinating, as delightful and as compulsive as any of the tales he has made up for us.”

OCTOBER 17

MUSIC

68. Hanson
Famous corn-fed brother trio Hanson have weathered 25 years in the music biz since their platinum album, Middle of Everywhere, dropped. They'll be celebrating this anniversary on an extended tour, playing tracks from this album, along with newer works.

OCTOBER 17-18

FESTIVALS

69. Seattle Interactive Conference
Seattle Interactive Conference is the culmination of the best technology that online business professionals, developers, and entrepreneurs from around the world have to offer. SIC brings technology, creativity, and current trends to one place for tech lovers to explore and discover. Attendees will be able to network and mingle with individuals in the tech industry while enjoying disruptive technology, business models, social media apps, new games, advertising, and more hands-on entertainment.

OCTOBER 17-NOVEMBER 18

PERFORMANCE

70. Coriolanus: Fight Like a Bitch
The all-woman cast of this infrequently produced Shakespearian tragedy stars Z Nation’s Nike Imoru, who showed off her ability to play King Lear and Lady Macbeth in her solo show Ode earlier this year. When she bellowed Lear's famous line, "Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage! Blow!" I felt a desperate urge to see her take on a kingly role of classical proportions, and the theater gods (who are taking the form of Rebel Kat Productions) have granted me this wish. Straight from the audition materials: “What happens when we smash our current political, gendered landscape onto the sacrosanct canvas of one of the greatest playwrights ever? If a man can destroy an entire city… can’t a woman do the same? We say they can.” RICH SMITH

OCTOBER 18

MUSIC

71. The Afghan Whigs with Har Mar Superstar
The Afghan Whigs are the real treat here. Greg Dulli's kinky, soul-inflected hard-rock project are still one of the most vital acts in alternative rock. Oh, also, their comeback album, Do the Beast, is a monster. JOSEPH SCHAFER

72. Iron & Wine
Oscillating between straightforward folk, alt-country, and generic traveling bard, singer-songwriter Sam Beam has been at the helm of Iron & Wine for over a decade now.

73. Paul Weller with Lucy Rose
British rock vet Paul Weller makes his second Seattle appearance since 2009, when he played the Moore. The venue change suggests waning popularity, but the former Jam and Style Council leader hasn’t declined artistically as steeply as some of his OG punk peers have. An adaptable, versatile musician, Weller has gone through punk-inflected mod, Motown-homaging soul, psychedelia, funk, and sensitive singer/songwriter motions over the decades. If he’s never really embarrassed himself through all those changes, he’s also rarely attained lofty heights in his 23-year solo career. Weller’s last two full-lengths, Sonik Kicks and Saturns Pattern, mark a steadfast reliance on solid rock foundations with hints of psychedelia—as if he nibbled a fifth of a tab of acid in the studio, just to add a glimmer of disorientation and chaos. A man in his mid 50s has many responsibilities, after all. DAVE SEGAL

READINGS & TALKS

74. Ron Chernow
I'm sure you're familiar with the Tony Award-winning smash hit musical explosion known as Hamilton? Well, I've been told Ron Chernow wrote the biography of Alexander Hamilton that Lin-Manuel Miranda used as source material for his wildly popular show. This year, Chernow will be touring with a new presidential biography about Ulysses S. Grant, probably the greatest writer ever to hold the office. RICH SMITH

OCTOBER 19

MUSIC

75. The Aquabats, Mean Jeans, Dog Party
You know that camp song, the one that never ends? "This is the song that never ends, yes it goes on and on my friends!" The Aquabats are the band equivalent to that song. Annoying to many, but childishly charming to some. And, like the song, they never really end. The 'Bats have kept up their ska-playing superhero act for about a decade now, surprisingly, and through all the trends and music-biz ups and downs, they've stayed on course, fighting off villains and assaulting their enamored fans with flying vegetables at live shows. You love them or you hate them—either way, the Aquabats remain true to themselves. "Some people started singing it, not knowing what it was, but they continued singing it forever just because..." MEGAN SELING

76. Zola Jesus with John Wiese
Zola Jesus (aka Nika Roza Danilova) is sort of a modern-day Siouxsie Sioux, a powerful singer with a propensity for dark, chilly, and semi-over-the-top synth ballads. Which makes her an unlikely—but totally likable—pop artist. Her fifth album, Taiga, is a bit of a departure from her past works. As The Stranger’s Dave Segal noted, it’s more accessible and slickly produced: The songs are still dramatic but less gloomy, her beats more club-worthy and her voice more soulful and melismatic (though still operatic—she was trained in opera). I’d still take her over [insert any pop star’s name here] any day. KATHLEEN RICHARDS

READINGS & TALKS

77. Lit Crawl Seattle: 2017
Last year, Rich Smith described the fifth annual Lit Crawl thus: "Lit Crawl is an obnoxious, overwhelming, FOMO-inducing literary nightmare that exploits the labor of writers who feel as if they have to say 'yes' to all readings. But last year all the events were really well-attended! And it ran pretty smoothly! And the evening introduced Seattle to some new writers and revived interest in more established ones!" Now the event is back for its sixth incarnation with more than 35 locations, and you won't want to miss it either.

OPENING OCTOBER 19

ART

78. Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect
Born in Pennsylvania 100 years ago, Andrew Wyeth is an American realist painter associated with regionalism. His paintings and drawings generally include figures—sometimes in a landscape, sometimes in contemplatively lit interiors—that simultaneously present drama and stillness. In the 1970s and ’80s, he painted more than 247 studies of a German-born woman named Helga Testorf, resulting in some of the most intimate and compelling examples of 20th-century portraiture. Organized in partnership with the Brandywine River Museum, Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect presents more than 100 works by this quintessential American artist. EMILY POTHAST

PERFORMANCE

79. Love, Chaos, and Dinner
Beloved circus/cabaret/comedy institution Teatro ZinZanni will return to Seattle for a dinner theater production of Love, Chaos, and Dinner. They promise "the same stunning, velvet-laden, and iconic Belgian spiegeltent Seattleites will remember from Teatro ZinZanni’s former location on lower Queen Anne." The cast is led by first-time "Madame ZinZanni" Ariana Savalas, and will feature a duo on aerial trapeze, a magician, a "contortionist-puppet," a yodeling dominatrix, a hoop aerialist, and a Parisian acrobat.

OCTOBER 19-21

MUSIC

80. Christian McBride
Lauded bassist Christian McBride, who's been a force in the jazz world for over 20 years and has played with musicians including Herbie Hancock and Sting, will perform with Benny Green and Lewis Nash in memory of Ray Brown.

OCTOBER 20

COMEDY

81. wellRED: From Dixie With Love
See stand-up from three Georgian and Tennesseean comedians, including "the Liberal Redneck" Trae Crowder, Drew Morgan, and Corey Ryan Forrester, who are touring across the country to promote their book Liberal Redneck Manifesto: Draggin Dixie Outta the Dark. Their take on the ideal South: "It’s about dancing to country music at a gay wedding. It’s about loving your neighbor whether you have the same religion, skin color, or sexual preference, as long as they cheer for the same college football team."

82. Whose Live Anyway?
The cast members of the Emmy-winning show Whose Line is it Anyway?—including Bellingham-born Ryan Stiles—will play their hilarious improv games onstage.

FOOD & DRINK

83. Behind the Table
Enjoy an evening of local art, live music, dinner, drinks, a silent auction, and more. Proceeds benefit The Market Community Safety Net, a fund that provides financial assistance to anyone working or living in Pike Place Market.

PERFORMANCE

84. Poppy
Bizarro pop Barbie web artist Poppy has racked up hundreds of millions of views on YouTube for her many surreal Technicolor videos. She'll be gearing up to release her debut album this October.

OCTOBER 20-21

FOOD & DRINK

85. The American Whiskey Experience
Consider a "Northwest premiere showcase of some of the finest and rarest American whiskeys." Drink cocktails, sample whiskey, and eat "whiskey-centric food pairings" from local chefs.

OCTOBER 20-31

PERFORMANCE

86. This is Halloween
Can Can's creepy yet cheery musical is back! Last year, Rich Smith wrote: "It's Tim Burton's classic The Nightmare Before Christmas repackaged as a semi-scandalous spectacle for the masses. The audience eats chicken skewers and knocks back $10 cocktails while they watch Tim Keller as Jack 'the Pumpkin King' Skellington sing and dance, cabaret-style, along with Luminous Pariah, Paris Original, Marissa Quimby, and Baby Kate, while a ghoulish orchestra pumps out the show's signature tunes. Despite the glitzy and consumerist exterior, the crew manages to smuggle a complicated cabaret about the horror of fixed identities into the unpretentious space of the Triple Door."

OCTOBER 21

MUSIC

87. Ariel Pink and Telecaves
They broke the mold when they made Runaways manager Kim Fowley, who left this mortal coil in 2015. When it comes to an heir apparent, though, look no further than Ariel Pink (born Ariel Rosenberg), who shares Fowley’s knack for insidious hooks and jumble-shop threads. If his records, like the Zappa-damaged double-album Pom Pom—it features five songs co-written with Fowley—can be scattershot affairs, Pink has a way with throwback tracks like "Lipstick," the imaginary theme to a neon-lit slasher flick, that helps to balance out bizarre proclamations like "I love pedophiles." (Huh?) Bust out the feather boas and the platform shoes, and prepare to get weird. KATHY FENNESSY

88. Bob Mould
While he may be best known for writing heartfelt anthems for the seminal punk band Hüsker Dü, Bob Mould has had a long and diverse career: forming short-lived-but-excellent power-pop band Sugar, releasing several cross-genre solo albums, and in more recent years abandoning rock altogether for electronic music. Now, at age 55, Mould has re-embraced the legacy of his Hüsker Dü–era works to deliver another round of introspective jangle punk at its finest. Beauty & Ruin, his last solo effort, sounds like a natural re-evolution from the decidedly Dü-y Silver Age, and sees Mould’s rediscovery of his deep pop sensibilities and driving rock roots. While Beauty is not a new day rising (*wink*) for Mould, his musical chameleon-ism doesn’t betray what he does best: smart, honest punk songs. BRITTNIE FULLER

89. Depeche Mode
Over the past 36 years, synth-pop pioneers Depeche Mode racked up 50 UK-charting singles and worldwide adoration for their emotional electronic sounds. Recently, as all good things are, they were appropriated by the "alt-right" (aka white supremacists) and the group immediately shunned their support (have they heard BDSM anthem "Master and Servant" or the practically socialist "Everything Counts," tho?). From the infectious synth-pop melodies of "Just Can't Get Enough" to the passionately stoic "Never Let Me Down Again," the band evolved from bright techno-pop to something darker and more industrial. They've been cited as an influence from Nine Inch Nails to Coldplay, and through the fetish wear and seductive darkness, Depeche Mode wrote some of the 20th century's best songs. BRITTNIE FULLER

90. Little Big Show #19: Perfume Genius with Briana Marela
When “genius” is right there in your band name, you’re going to have to deliver. Fortunately, Mike Hadreas figured out how to summon the goods. The first two records were real good, but Perfume Genius achieved a glory on 2014’s Too Bright that only grew more glorious on this year’s No Shape. If there’s any justice, he’ll be carried out of this show on a team of white stallions. SEAN NELSON

OCTOBER 21-22

MUSIC

91. Courtney Barnett with Kurt Vile & The Sea Lice
The first time I heard Courtney Barnett sing, I was writing a passive-aggressive e-mail in a stall of the Sub Pop bathroom, which ended up being the ideal landscape for her casual misdirects of true emotion. With inscrutable delivery and a ramshackle lyrical structure, Barnett tells you about her deepest secrets, most abject failures, and forbidden needs in the course of a simple rock song—seemingly downplaying her own humanity by showcasing it completely. Some of the most affecting music, Barnett’s included, comes from artists who feel exactly like your peers and yet create something that sounds better than however you tried to say it. KIM SELLING

OCTOBER 21-22

GEEK & GAMING

92. GE2
Spend an evening playing Esports, board games, dodgeball, and laser tag, racing drones, and experiencing VR.

OCTOBER 22

READINGS & TALKS

93. Humans of New York: Brandon Stanton
Brandon Stanton gained international fame for his Facebook page "Humans of New York," on which he posted his street photography documenting the interesting outfits, poses, and activities of NYC residents. But what made his work really interesting were the captions, often quotes from the people being photographed, that allowed glimpses into their inner lives and most traumatic struggles. There have been quite a few smart take-down pieces of Stanton that point out the potential dangers of his empathetic ethnography, but ultimately, Stanton has achieved his goal of humanizing strangers and giving audiences practical examples of the (newly minted) word "sonder" (the realization that strangers have as rich and complex a life as you do). At this event, Stanton will share "his own personal story, and the perspective he has gained since embarking on his journey to help others tell theirs."

OCTOBER 22-23

MUSIC

94. Broken Social Scene with Belle Game
Easy listening is a term most commonly deployed as a pejorative, but I think Broken Social Scene make a convincing case for its use as an accolade. The loosely defined, sprawling indie-rock collective's equally loose and sprawling guitar rock could not possibly be easier on the ears, but that's not to the detriment of their songs, which range from tiny pop treasures à la "Anthem for a Seventeen Year Old Girl" to careening yet controlled studio riots to impeccable chill-out music just the right side of yacht rock. ERIC GRANDY

OCTOBER 23

MUSIC

95. The Black Angels with Ron Gallo
The Black Angels' music has always come off as something like psych-rock 101. While they have a solid discography in the Velvet Underground/13th Floor Elevators/Doors style, which has become a default mode for a lot of psych groups, the Black Angels never conjure the delirium and otherness that the greatest psych artists achieve. These Texans too closely adhere to psychedelia's dog-eared manual rather than forging new pathways to aural transcendence. They may be (figuratively) tripping, but they've always got one hand on the reins. Don't get me wrong: The Black Angels are a very good band, probably more enjoyable than 79 percent of the groups working today. But they could stand to fire all of their guns at once and explode into space once in a while. DAVE SEGAL

96. Milky Chance
Known for their 2013 EP Stolen Dance, German duo Milky Chance are back on tour for Blossom, their second full-length album rife with electronic beats and indie-folk melodies.

READINGS & TALKS

97. G. Willow Wilson with Jamala Henderson
G. Willow Wilson used to describe herself as an "upper-middle-class American White girl with bland politics and polite beliefs." That changed when she converted to Islam in college, worked as a journalist in Egypt, and began writing the comic series Ms. Marvel, featuring a Pakistani American teenage girl from Jersey City. Hear Willow discuss the series, moderated by KUOW's Jamala Henderson.

OCTOBER 24

MUSIC

98. Yelle
Maybe it's because everything sounds better in French (cwoisssaaauunnt), but there's something extra super about Yelle's French electro-posi-pop. It's bright Euro disco with a slightly comical (can a synthesizer sound like bouncy house feels?) approach to the music that makes the aforementioned genre more listenable than usual, especially when each song is catchier than the last. Yelle's (Julie Budet) neon voice shines with a glittery sexiness that is not gross or eye-rolly in the least. And the last time I saw her, matching drummers and coordinating outfits were involved! EMILY NOKES

READINGS & TALKS

99. David Neiwert: Alt America: The Rise of the Radical Right in the Age of Trump
The journalist David Neiwert wrote a book a few years ago about killer whales (Of Orcas and Men) that was so packed with illuminating facts it practically changed my life. His latest is a book is Alt-America: The Rise of the Radical Right in the Age of Trump, about neo-Nazis, militias, conspiracy theorists, xenophobes, and the president of the United States. For more than two decades, Neiwert has been tracking homergrown extremists for the Southern Poverty Law Center, so who better to provide what is being billed as “a deeply researched and authoratative report on the growth of fascism and far-right terrorism.” CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

OCTOBER 25

MUSIC

100. Silversun Pickups with Minus The Bear
I first heard Silversun Pickups when their song “Panic Switch” was the only good thing about the trailer to the movie Sucker Punch. (Does anyone remember that movie?) After purchasing that record, Swoon, I discovered that the band had a less-than-stellar reputation in critical circles. Screw the critics, I later thought, watching the band open for Metallica in Detroit. They’re energetic and driving live, even though singer Brian Aubert has a somewhat delicate voice. Every one of their records has at least a handful of excellent chrome-plated-but-plaintive rock songs, and 2015’s Better Nature is no different. JOSEPH SCHAFER

101. Slowdive with Cherry Glazerr
British shoegaze giants Slowdive recently joined the ’90s reunion circuit. Lovers of “noisy guitars and cool pedals” (sayeth the band of themselves), Slowdive are a legendary part of the early-’90s Creation Records history, and should lull listeners into a dream-pop coma tonight with their walls of blissed-out distortion. BRITTNIE FULLER

102. Yelawolf, Mikey Mike, Big Henri, Cookup Boss
Yelawolf is a lean, tattooed, half-white, half-Cherokee MC from the unlikely hiphop outpost of Gadsden, Alabama, at the tail end of the Appalachians. He has floppy, jet-black hair that falls somewhere between mullet and uncharged Mohawk. He's probably the most unusual face in Southern hiphop right now, and after years of mixtape toil, he's poised for big things in the year to come. ERIC GRANDY

READINGS & TALKS

103. Amy Tan: Where the Past Begins
Amy Tan has written beautifully (and sometimes controversially) about Chinese-American culture, generational gaps, and familial relationships; her best-known books are The Joy Luck Club (which was made into a fairly groundbreaking movie, for Hollywood standards) and The Valley of Amazement. She's here to share her latest work, Where the Past Begins, a memoir about how she became a writer.

MUSIC

104. Action Bronson
Action Bronson's towering concoctions, whether they're meals or songs, only seem over-the-top once he tells you so. The best part of his music isn't necessarily what he says as much as how he says it. You can pick any Bronson song and find some of his favorite references: '80s wrestlers, '90s athletes, his hometown of Queens, New York, and yes, food, all expertly arranged and distorted. JACKSON HATHORN

105. Hoodie Allen, Luke Christopher, Myles Parrish
"Hoodie-Hop" progenitor Hoodie Allen will be back in town for an all-ages rager rife with pop-infused bars and guest artists like Luke Christopher and Myles Parrish.

106. Songhoy Blues
Malian blues, West African throwback funk, and desert rock will take the stage in the form of Songhoy Blues.

READINGS & TALKS

107. An Evening with Anna Faris
Actress (and UW alumna) Anna Faris will discuss and sign her new memoir, Unqualified, which "reveals her unique take on how to navigate the bizarre, chaotic, and worthwhile adventure of finding love."

OCTOBER 26-NOVEMBER 12

FILM

108. 13th Annual HUMP! Film Festival
Every year we put out the call to sex-havers everywhere to submit a homegrown amateur porn film depicting whatever they're into (barring poop, kids, and animals, of course). The result is an incredibly diverse representation of human sexuality in all its straight, gay, trans, queer, kinky, funny, pissy, painful, and pretty forms. (And then it goes away, allowing the filmmakers to go back to their normal lives, thanks to the festival's strict privacy and security policies.) That diversity is also reflected in HUMP!'s audiences, making for a unique theater experience. The person sitting next to you might be seeing your everyday kind of sex for the very first time. In a world where fear and ignorance breed hatred, HUMP!'s demystifying inclusivity is on the front line of deflecting destructive alienation. (You also might surprise yourself by getting turned on by something unexpected.) And, like the best film festivals, it's also fun, thought provoking, and often hilarious. MARJORIE SKINNER

OCTOBER 27

HALLOWEEN

109. Seduction: A Fundraiser for the Seattle Erotic Art Festival
The Foundation for Sex Positive Culture and the Seattle Erotic Art Festival present what they describe as "a carnival of delights!" From interactive installations to aerial and bondage shows to an Oddities Emporium, this event will be kinda artsy and definitely sensual.

110. FreakNight 2017
Annual high-key wild-out throwdown FreakNight raises the bar for their 20th anniversary celebration, with a two-day set of live music, dancing, and a darkly neon environment of circus surprises, bizarre sideshow wonders, and carnival rides.

MUSIC

111. Kesha with Savoy Motel
Witness pop star Kesha perform as her newest, most colorfully redemptive iteration with Nashville glam rockers Savoy Motel.

112. Snakehips, STWO, Yahtzel
Blog house superheroes Snakehips' remix of "Warm Water" by Banks essentially made her entire career worthwhile, and while we wouldn't say the same of all their remixes, they're reliably groovy dance technicians KYLE FLECK

113. Tegan and Sara
If you have a twin, you basically owe it to the world to start a band with them and cash in on those perfect harmonies. Cases in point: the Breeders, P.S. Eliot, Wet Nurse, and um… Good Charlotte? Fellow twin band, Canadian pop stars Tegan and Sara, make the kind of music that fits seamlessly into a Forever 21 soundtrack but somehow still oozes real emotion. They weren’t always pumping through shopping-center sound systems alongside recycled air, though. The record that endeared me to them was 2004’s So Jealous, which I first heard through the CD library of the community radio station where I volunteered. For months I would drive home at 3 a.m. after my DJ shift listening to the perfectly crafted indie-rock breakup record, and feel justified in liking something my cooler friends deemed uncool because Weezer/Rentals member Matt Sharp played Moog on it. Tegan and Sara’s rise to full-fledged pop stars has made the music more electronic and mainstream-palatable, but it kept the same whip-smart heart (and magical twin harmonies) that first cut straight to my heart. ROBIN EDWARDS

OCTOBER 27-28

COMEDY

114. Arsenio Hall
Join comedian Arsenio Hall, best known for his late-night talk show The Arsenio Hall Show, which debuted in 1989.

OCTOBER 27-29

FESTIVALS

115. Steamposium 2017
It's a three-day celebration of all things steampunk, so bust out your finest clockwork corsets and reserve some zeppelin parking down at the waterfront. Spectate future-past style parades at the Tea and Fashion Show, snoop out the villain at the Murder Mystery, and hear concerts by Abney Park and Unwoman.

OCTOBER 28

HALLOWEEN

116. Fremonster Spectacular
This Halloween party promises wild DJ performances, a costume contest, a full bar with specialty cocktails, festive chocolates, and performances.

117. Haunt: The Ultimate Halloween Bash
Dance to sets from "party band" Brand X and DJ Funkdaddy, watch other spooky performances, and participate in a costume contest for "most elaborate," "most creative," "scariest," "best group," and other categories.

MUSIC

118. Alvvays with Jay Som
Alvvays, saddled with general Canadian cuteness, hark back to a time of indie-pop nostalgia wherein the ice-cream truck jingle morphs into a siren song of teen drone necessity. This time never actually existed, which makes Alvvays that much more affecting, a band capable of making you miss an age through which you never lived. KIM SELLING

119. NEEDTOBREATHE with Guests
Southern rockers NEEDTOBREATHE bring their South Carolinian shred to the Moore on their All The Feels Tour, ostensibly named for what will be invoked within you once you experience the unbridled energy of their live show.

120. Shadows: Toro Y Moi (DJ Set) and Sango with Romaro Franceswa, Qreepz, Chong The Nomad
Upper Left will be taking a more avant-garde approach to Halloween this year, with an evening of live performances and DJ sets that will soundtrack the darkest of holidays. Revel in the haunted imagery of a bygone era alongside the sounds of Toro Y Moi, Sango, Romaro Franceswa, Qreepz, and Chong The Nomad.

OCTOBER 29

MUSIC

121. Mary Lambert with Mal Blum
Queer pop artist Mary Lambert, who performed with Macklemore and Ryan Lewis on "Same Love," will perform tracks off her latest EP Bold, along with guest musician Mal Blum. She's got a nice blend of snark and sincerity, so if you like smart lyrics and sunny hooks, go check her out.

PODCASTS

122. An Evening with with Brian Reed
One thing that the podcast S-Town (a truth-based radio mystery à la Serial) is great for is provoking strong opinions—everyone and their mother had a take on the style, investigation, and ethics of the series. At this event, get a peek into the mind of S-Town co-creator and host Brian Reed, who will share audio outtakes from production, reporting details that were left out of the final product, and anecdotes from the process.

CLOSING OCTOBER 29

ART

123. Storme Webber: Casino: A Palimpsest
Storme Webber is a Two-Spirit First Nations (Alutiiq/Black/Choctaw) interdisciplinary artist, curator, writer, and performer who creates socially engaged texts and images at the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, memory, and spirit. Through the exhibition of archival photographs, installation, and experimental storytelling, Webber uses the pre-Stonewall working-class LGBTQ history of the Pioneer Square neighborhood as a point of departure to shed light on the hidden stories of the marginalized people in Seattle's present and past. Expect to see the historical made timeless, and the timeless made tangible. EMILY POTHAST

HALLOWEEN

124. Fright Fest
Listen to the swooshing of the wind on rollercoasters in the dark, check out two haunted houses, walk down a creepy trail through the woods, and make scary arts and crafts at Fright Fest.

PERFORMANCE

125. Pride And Prejudice
Kate Hamill (known for her adaptations of Sense and Sensibility and Vanity Fair) offers another modern take on Jane Austen through this production of Pride and Prejudice. This run at the Seattle Rep will be the play's West Coast premiere, with direction by Amanda Dehnert, who has directed shows at a number of regional theaters (including the esteemed Oregon Shakespeare Festival).

OCTOBER 30

MUSIC

126. A$AP Mob, Playboi Carti, Key!, Cozy Boys
Known possibly more for what they've taken rather than what they've originated, A$AP Mob returns to the best coast on a promotional tour for their recent release Cozy Tapes Vol. 2: Too Cozy. Expect appearances from A$AP Rocky, A$AP Twelvyy, A$AP Nast, and A$AP Ant, with support from Playboi Carti, Key!, and Cozy Boys to round the night out.

127. Chelsea Wolfe with Youth Code
Chelsea Wolfe’s 2015 album Abyss was a big step forward for the Los Angeles doom-folk maven, an alluringly abrasive witch’s cauldron of overblown goth pop, desperate balladry, and sludgy metal. Its bounds more hi-fi than her early work, with industrial beats that pound like premium-grade Nine Inch Nails and ghoulish ambience swirling in the margins of the songs, and the songwriting matches the production’s ambition. Wolfe's aesthetic sometimes leans toward histrionics, as goth tends to, but there are moments like “After the Fall” that approach latter-day Portishead for grandiosity, a kind of glamorously damaged suicide soundtrack that’s called for in certain times of emotional desolation. KYLE FLECK

READINGS & TALKS

128. Walter Isaacson: Leonardo da Vinci
The very influential Walter Isaacson (President and CEO of the Aspen Institute, former CEO of CNN, and former managing editor of Time) has written a number of very good biographies of people including Henry Kissinger, Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, and Steve Jobs. At this event, he'll share his latest book: Leonardo Da Vinci, which explores the artist's life and essential genius.

OCTOBER 31

HALLOWEEN

129. The Bowie Ball with BowieVision
The local tribute group Bowievision—featuring members of Dudley Manlove Quartet and Purr Gato, plus saxophonist Brian Bermudez—replicate as faithfully as they can the chameleonic British singer/songwriter’s hits, with a light show and video backdrops for bonus dazzlement. DAVE SEGAL

CLOSING NOVEMBER 4

HALLOWEEN

130. Georgetown Morgue
Want to grope through a pitch-black maze with a bloody clown screaming in your ear, but most likely emerge with all your important bits still attached? Cheesy as it looks, Georgetown Morgue has scared a lot of people. Not recommended for claustrophobes.

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